How to Make Your Site Dyslexia Friendly? 

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Dyslexia Friendly

Dyslexia can have a substantial impact on a person’s life, and one of the avenues it can do this is by making the web a little more difficult to navigate. Sure, this may not sound all too bad at first, but for those who struggle to use the web on a daily basis, this is no small matter. Dyslexia Friendly-

Dyslexia statistics show that a staggering fifteen percent of all people may actually have dyslexia, and making sure all of said people feel included and can have a good internet experience is of astronomical importance. Let’s jump into it and talk about how you can make your website a little more Dyslexia-friendly.

Utilise The Correct Tools 

Whilst there may be a few avenues you can go down that won’t require you to make drastic changes to your site (some of which we will talk about in the next section), if you are truly looking to make your site dyslexia-friendly, then there are a few steps you are going to need to take. 

Due to the fact that Dyslexia can affect people in so many different ways and fundamentally change the way they interact with websites, it would be hard to manually go through an entire site to make it more suited to people with dyslexia. 

Moreover, this avenue would also require you to develop some form of software to perform some functions that are just not available with basic development tools, and for most people, this route is just not feasible. 

Luckily, there is a solution to this problem, and that is by using accessibility overlays. Accessibility overlays can make a website accessible to people with a wide range of physical or mental ailments, and Dyslexia is certainly no exception. This type of software can allow you to make your website much more inclusive overall, and it is one of the only ways that you can truly make your site Dyslexia-friendly. 

 A Few Small Changes Can Make a World Of Difference

When it comes to creating a dyslexia friendly website, making a few key changes can make all the difference. To give a few examples of this, you could use a ton of headers to allow people with Dyslexia to stay focused, you could make sure to only use basic colours so any already-in-place colour overlays do not intertwine, keep paragraphs short to allow for easy reading, and utilise special fonts that can be beneficial to Dyslexic people. 

These examples are but a few of the many minor changes you could employ that can make a massive difference, and when combined, they can make any site much more accessible in general.

We truly hope we have given you a much better idea about how you can go ahead and make your own site dyslexia-friendly. Whilst this venture might take a little effort in order to pull off, we believe it is well worth the effort, and you would be surprised at just how big of a difference one site can make on someone’s overall internet experience. 

 

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